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The twin lakes of Lough Erne, Upper and Lower, cover one-third of Fermanagh. With such an abundance of water including lakes, rivers and canals there are countless opportunities to experience the great outdoors this Summer. Alternatively take in The Fermanagh Lakelands from some the stunning view points including Lough Navar Forest or explore the natural beauty and stunning scenery of Fermanagh from high above via Cuilcagh Boardwalk, Ireland’s stairway to heaven.

Lough Erne

Lough Erne is the name of two connected lakes in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is the second-biggest lake system in Northern Ireland and Ulster, and the fourth biggest in Ireland. The lakes are widened sections of the River Erne, which flows north and then curves west into the Atlantic. The smaller southern lake is called the Upper Lough as it is higher up the river. The bigger northern lake is called the Lower Lough or Broad Lough. The town of Enniskillen lies on the short stretch of river between the lakes. The lake has 154 islands along with many coves and inlets. When windy, navigation on Lower Lough Erne, running for 26 miles (42 km) almost to the Atlantic, can be something of a challenge with waves of open-sea dimensions. Shallow Upper Lough Erne, spreading southeast of Enniskillen for about 12 miles, is a maze of islands.[1] The River Erne is 80ml (129 km)ong and drains an area of about 4,350 km2.

Lough Navar 

From the main forest drive there are lots of short walks signed to various points of interest. This includes views over Lower Lough Erne, and on a clear day the Sperrin Mountains and the west coast of Donegal. Lough Navar Forest is part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark

Cuilcagh Mountain Trail

The Cuilcagh Legnagbrocky Trail is a linear route which will appeal to walkers with some experience walking in the hills. The route is quite isolated and showcases the scenic wilderness of Cuilcagh Mountain. The trail meanders along a quiet farmland track before traversing a wooden boardwalk that consists of a steady climb to the mountain face. Here a stepped boardwalk climbs through steep terrain and boulders fields before reaching the summit plateau. A rough mountain path negotiates the wild summit plateau for a few kilometres before reaching an ancient cairn (the remains of a burial mound dating from the Bronze Age 2,500 – 500 BC) that stands at 666 metres (2,182 ft) above sea level.The imposing mountain flanks of Cuilcagh give this walk a very atmospheric feeling providing breathing views, the most impressive view is of Lough Atona, a lake nestled at the foot of the mountain which was carved out by the glacier during the last Ice Age approximately 13,000 years ago.Please be aware that:It is important to choose a route that suits everybody in your group.

You are strongly recommended to walk Cuilcagh Mountain with OSNI or OSNI Discover Series map 1:50,000 Sheet 26 available in most shops and Visitor Information Centres.
Weather conditions on Cuilcagh Mountain can be quick to change & inhospitable all year round making way finding difficult in poor visibility at any time of the year.
Equip yourself for walking in a mountainous area, waterproof clothing, boots, spare clothing, map, compass, first aid, food, drink etc.
Carry a map and stay to the way marked trail. Be aware that mobile reception in the area is poor. Let someone know where you have gone and when you are expected back.